SAT vocabulary inductively

Overview: 

This lesson allows students to take advantage of their unconscious knowledge of words and word parts (morphology) and the relationship between words and phrases in sentences (syntax) is extremely useful in helping students learn challenging vocabulary words. 

Grade Level: 
Grades 9-12
Class Time Needed: 
Under 30 minutes
Lesson Plan: 

SAT Vocabulary and Inductive Reasoning

Having students take advantage of their unconscious knowledge about words and word parts (morphology) and the relationship between words and phrases in sentences (syntax) is extremely useful in helping students learn challenging vocabulary words.

In this class, the students were directed to learn five vocabulary words each week. The list comes from a SAT Vocab master list (see below). The students were introduced to the vocabulary on Monday, given a vocabulary square sheet (see attached), and then given about 10-15 minutes to complete their vocabulary squares. After using their own “toolkits,” they could turn to using dictionaries to look up the definitions and parts of speech. (If the students did not finish their vocabulary squares, they had the week to work on them, as the vocab squares were not due until the beginning of class on Friday.)

Before I taught on Monday at the beginning of the class period, I would write five sentences (using each of the vocab words) that gave enough context to enable the students to be able to identify the part of speech and the definition based on their knowledge of being speakers of the English language. I would put the vocab sentences under the document camera and go through them sentence by sentence. I would read each sentence out loud and then ask the students to identify the part of speech and definition and give a reason why they think so. I gave examples of little tricks to help them identify part of speech. For example, if the word ends in –ous, what category is it? We would consider other “easier” words with that ending (enormous, for example) and use those in a sentence: the enormous elephant. Students could easily determine that the word was an adjective and that the ous suffix always occurs on an adjective. They were able to give reasons such as this when they gave their evidence for why they thought it was a certain part of speech.

SAT VOCABULARY LIST

The vocabulary list we used is taken from an SAT master list.

  1. ubiquitous
  2.  panacea
  3.  impetuous
  4.  desecrate
  5.  Ephemeral

 

  1.  lurid
  2.  tumultuous
  3.  acerbic
  4.  conflagration
  5. Antiquated

 

  1. bereave
  2. disparity
  3. ebullient
  4. fastidious
  5. exorable

 

  1.  solicitous
  2.  exculpate
  3.  grandiloquence
  4.  magnanimous
  5.  Inchoate

 

  1.  mercurial
  2.  lugubrious
  3.  terse
  4.  obfuscate
  5. Ignominious

 

  1. ruminate
  2. inadvertently
  3. augment
  4. prodigious
  5. commiserate

 

  1. indignation
  2.  encumber
  3. disconcert
  4. exonerate
  5. affinity

 

  1. forlorn
  2. pernicious
  3. recalcitrant
  4. temerity
  5. haughty

 

  1. genial
  2. furtive
  3. noxious
  4. pervade
  5. omnipotent

 

  1. insolence
  2. insinuate
  3. sublime
  4. redress
  5.  vituperate

 

  1. wanton
  2. placid
  3. uncouth
  4. wistful
  5. sycophant

 

  1. vindictive
  2. usurp
  3. supplicate
  4. ostensible
  5.  torpid

 

  1. avarice
  2. obstreperous
  3. despotic
  4. voracious
  5. supersede

 

  1. demean
  2. invective
  3. truculent
  4. nadir
  5.  nascent

 

  1. alacrity
  2. laconic
  3. obsequious
  4. zenith
  5. unctuous